HCPS Support with Edsby

Edsby will be a major resource to use to connect to students and parents. HCPS has put together 4 videos to support use with Edsby on Youtube.

Remember, for additional questions or help you can contact the E-Learning support line 272-4785 or Tech Support 272-4786

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDTfjqbRo8_qGCSudw5-zoGqwXhVCzcdo

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Assigning enVision Lessons to Your Students

Many teachers would like to utilize the enVision lessons/resource available in Pearson Realize through Clever. Folsom Elementary Math Coach Megan Donini has been kind enough to share a video she created for her staff walking through how to assign enVision lessons to students. Enjoy! And thank you Megan!!

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Using Zoom…

Many teachers are interested in learning more about Zoom, and how they might access this resource to use with students next week. Check out these two helpful links for the time being to get up and running. Also check out the HCPS Professional Development System in IDEAS for additional webinars offered by the PD dept.


https://blog.zoom.us/wordpress/2020/03/13/how-to-use-zoom-for-online-learning/
Sign up for free Zoom for teachers (normally a paid subscription)

https://zoom.us/docs/doc/Tips%20and%20Tricks%20for%20Teachers%20Educating%20on%20Zoom.pdf
2 page tips and tricks put out by Zoom

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Need help accessing enVision resources in Pearson Realize? Check this post out!

All enVision K-5 resources can be accessed using Pearson Realize through Clever. HCPS teachers can check out this video for support in accessing these materials.

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Accessing the Elementary Math Instructional Contingency Plan

The elementary math team has put together a video on how teachers can access the HCPS instructional contingency plan. Please check out the video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shCBy7CcdN0

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HCPS Coronavirus Update

HCPS Coronavirus Update

As we use the week after spring break to begin planning for distance eLearning, please refer to official messages from Superintendent Addison Davis through your district email.  We will be posting Blog updates here to support teachers in planning specifically for mathematics!

  • Teachers Obtain Necessary Materials for Learning (all schools)
  • “Grab and Go” Breakfast and Lunch Meals (23 specified schools)
  • Schools Prepare for Mobile Device Distribution (all schools)
  • Schools Prepare to Print Instructional Packets for Students in Need (elementary schools)
  • District Personnel Provide Schools with Additional Devices (schools identified with high need)
  • District Provides Detailed eLearning Plan that Defines Roles and Responsibilities (online)
  • District Opens eLearning, Mental Health, IT Support, & General Question Hotlines

Call Hotlines

Numbers

Operations Times

Days of Operations

eLearning Support

(813) 272-4785

8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Monday- Friday

Technology Support

(813) 272-4786

8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Monday- Friday

Mental Health Support

(813) 272-4787

8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Monday- Friday

General Questions

(813) 272-4788

8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Monday- Friday

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YouCubed Classroom Math(s) Posters

YouCubed Classroom Math(s) Posters

So she says maths, we say math, but I think we can both agree there are some pretty great ideas coming from Jo Boaler and YouCubed math at Stanford University.  The newest resource YouCubed has released is a set of classroom posters, including posters on Norms, Discussion, Growth Mindset, and the Value of Mistakes among others.

Check them out here: https://www.youcubed.org/resource/posters/

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Getting to know your students

Getting to know your students

The first days of school are great for getting first impressions of your new students. Collecting information from students is interesting and fun when they are given open ended sentences to complete. You can gain insight on their personality (i.e. are they extroverts or introverts), learn about their interests (for differentiation), and fun facts about them personally.

Some of my favorite open ended sentences to use for my beginning of the year questionnaire are: 1) I learn from teachers best when… 2) I don’t learn from teachers that… 3) In math, I struggle with… 4) Last year in math my grades were… 5) Three things you should know about me are…

Creating a back to school questionnaire for your students should match your personality as a teacher and should be fun for students to complete. Students love to open up about themselves, especially when they don’t have to share in front of their classmates. It’s also fun to read student responses back to them at the end of the school year so they can hear how they have changed!

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Solving with Multiple Methods

Solving with Multiple Methods

If you are familiar with the Common Core Progressions documents, you may recognize the name Bill McCallum. He is a Common Core Standards author as well as an author of the Progressions. He frequently posts to the site Common Core Tools, and hosts a question and answer forum which can be very valuable for teachers looking for clarification of a standard.

He recently posted about students using multiple methods to solve (computation) problems. Much like a related post we published about turning strategies into “algorithms,” his post talks about the do’s and don’ts of having students solve with multiple methods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His transportation analogy really helps to clear this topic up. For example, we should have multiple methods of solving strategies just as we have multiple methods of transportation, i.e. a bike, a car, a bus, and walking. We should know which is best to use and when, based on the situation. (I may walk or bike to school, but I’m not going to bike to Disney World!) And students shouldn’t be asked to solve the same problem in multiple ways if they have already determined a method that works for them. (Unless they may be comparing strategies to look for efficiency)

Check out his post, and visit the Common Core Tools site.

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Dividing Fractions for Understanding

Dividing Fractions for Understanding

Student understanding of dividing with fractions is usually regulated to something to the effect of, “You need to flip the fraction and you need to multiply.” As a teacher, I am usually excited if students can even recall that information. So why is this concept so difficult for students to understand and retain? Is it because they have no understanding of why they are flipping a fraction numerically?

Teaching division of fractions can be more meaningful to students when models are used before using an algorithm. Students need to be taught this concept using their previous understanding of multiplication and division. What does division mean? It tells you how many groups of a quantity there are in a whole amount. So phrasing these problems into those terms will help students conceptualize what they are doing with the fractions.

The following link provides a great description of how to teach division of fractions by having students draw and analyze a model of the problem.
http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/solsearch/sol/math/6/mess_6-4_6-6ab_1.pdf

Fraction strips can also be used to help students conceptualize what is happening numerically when you are dividing fractions. Check out this video from PBS: https://florida.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mgbh.math.nf.divofrac/division-of-fractions-using-fraction-strips/#.WXpNVojyuM8

References:

Virginia Department of Education(2011). Modeling Division of Fractions. Retrieved from Virginia DOE website http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/solsearch/sol/math/6/mess_6-4_6-6ab_1.pdf

PBS Learning Media(2017). Division of Fractions: Using Fraction Strips. Retrieved from PBS & WGBH Educational Foundation websitehttps://florida.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/mgbh.math.nf.divofrac/division-of-fractions-using-fraction-strips/#.WXpPLYjyuM9

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Are your students “Number Shoppers” instead of “Problem Solvers”? Try numberless word problems!

Are your students “Number Shoppers” instead of “Problem Solvers”?  Try numberless word problems!

grocery+shopping+clip+art1
“Number Shoppers”….we’ve all encountered them: students who just plow through a story problem, pulling numbers out as if they were just grabbing their favorite snacks off the shelf and tossing them into a shopping cart; no regard for the value of the numbers and what the represent, or the action taking place in the problem. Sometimes, it seems like there isn’t even any thinking going on!

On his blog “Teaching to the Beat of Different Drummer“, Brian Bushart suggests numberless word problems as an instructional strategy to help remedy this common challenge that plagues math classrooms. He states, “In essence, numberless word problems are designed to provide scaffolding that allows students the opportunity to develop a better understanding of the underlying structure of word problems.” Numberless word problems, combined with teacher facilitated questioning, are word problems that get kids thinking before they ever have numbers or a question to act on.

Inspiration for the problem can be drawn from an already existing problem in a textbook or other resource. Then, the numbers are removed and the problem is stripped down; the problem is scaffolded by sharing additional information with students, piece by piece. The power of a numberless word problem lies in the conversation students have as each new piece of information is shared. That conversation is driven by the planned questions asked by the teacher as more and more information is revealed.

Here is one example that Bushart shares:
Inspiration:
original problem
Scaffolded Problems:
scaffolded problem
Planned Questions:
questions

Read more at Bushart’s blog page “numberless word problems“, which includes posts on how to get started on using the problems in your classroom, tips for writing numberless problems, and a bank of numberless word problems ready to be tried out with your kiddos!

You can follow Bushart on his blog and @bstockus on Twitter. He also co-moderates the Twitter chat #ElemMathChat on Thursdays at 8pm CST.

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Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Relating Fractions to Decimals

Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Relating Fractions to Decimals

Digging deeper into decimal fractions?
…there is a CAP for that!
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View the “Train the Trainer” video on “Relating Fractions to Decimals” below to ensure that your instruction has truly met the depth of the 4th grade MAFS standards. Yes, these trainings were written for the benefit of parents, but the anticipated misconceptions and instructional strategies will be useful when planning to review critical areas at the end of 4th grade to prepare students for 5th.

Follow the steps below to access the 4th grade “Relating Fractions to Decimals CAP (Connecting Academics & Parents)” training materials, including the powerpoint and ancillary resources.

• Step 1: Log into your ideas account.
• Step 2: Go to the Elementary Mathematics Icon.
• Step 3: Click on the “CAP Connecting Academics and Parents” icon.

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• Step 4: Click on “Grade 4 CAP Math Parent Workshops”.

4th cap ideas 1

• Step 5: Click on 4th CAP “Relating Fractions and Decimals”.

4th cap deci

• Step 6: From there, explore the folder to access all the resources you would need to implement the training, including the powerpoint.
cap decimals

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Inside Mathematics Illuminates the Standards for Mathematical Practice

Inside Mathematics Illuminates the Standards for Mathematical Practice

Do you ever find it difficult to to wrap your head around what each of the 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice might look like in your specific grade level? Or do you struggle with how to incorporate the SMPs into your daily lesson plans in a way that purposefully engages students with the Mathematics Florida Standards?
smps
At http://www.insidemathematics.org/common-core-resources/mathematical-practice-standards , Inside Mathematics sheds some light on the SMPs with video clips of individual examples of each of the practice standards in classroom lessons across a variety of grade levels.

Since it is also important to keep in mind that the practices can, and should, be evident together in a lesson, there are also video clips of “Mentors of Mathematical Practice” at http://www.insidemathematics.org/common-core-resources/mentors-of-mathematical-practice that offer a view of teachers who commonly engage their students in multiple practices simultaneously.

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Reboot Your Regrouping Reteach!

Reboot Your Regrouping Reteach!

What is the one math concept that you still feel students have not quiet mastered in second grade? “Regrouping,” you say. Well before you pull another small group to line up place values and regroup to the tens, consider rebooting the regrouping instruction completely. Many 2nd graders are not ready to make sense of the standard algorithm for addition and subtraction and the standards do not require it. If students have not mastered the algorithm at this point in the year, chances are likely that the student’s number sense needs to be developed further. Check out this one minute Origo video, to see some strategies for developing a students’ understanding of addition with regrouping.

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Math Journaling in Kindergarten

Math Journaling in Kindergarten

Check out this video on using Math Journal in Kindergarten as a tool for informal formative assessment!

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Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th grade Equivalent Fractions

Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th grade Equivalent Fractions

Students struggling with using fraction models to explain WHY two fractions are equivalent?
…there is a CAP for that!
nf11

View the “Train the Trainer” video on “Equivalent Fractions” below to ensure that your instruction has truly met the depth of the 4th grade MAFS standards. Yes, these trainings were written for the benefit of parents, but many of the suggestions will be useful when planning to review critical areas at the end of 4th grade to prepare students for 5th.

Follow the steps below to access the 4th grade “Equivalent Fractions CAP (Connecting Academics & Parents)” training materials, including the powerpoint and ancillary resources.

• Step 1: Log into your ideas account.
• Step 2: Go to the Elementary Mathematics Icon.
• Step 3: Click on the “CAP Connecting Academics and Parents” icon.

cap-fractions-1-2

• Step 4: Click on “Grade 4 CAP Math Parent Workshops”.

4th cap ideas 1

• Step 5: Click on 4th CAP “Equivalent Fractions”.

cap fract

• Step 6: From there, explore the folder to access all the resources you would need to implement the training, including the powerpoint.
4th equiv fract

fract online resources

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3 Strategies to Keep Math Convo Moving

3 Strategies to Keep Math Convo Moving

classmeeting
Most of us have some “go-to” questions to initiate math conversations…”How did you get that?” “Did anyone solve it another way?” “Does anyone disagree and why?”…
But what do we do when that conversation dies out before our students discuss and uncover the desired math ideas?

The short article “Three Follow-up Strategies to Keep Math Discussions Moving Forward” discusses the follow-up strategies of probing, scaffolding and positioning to address the most common challenges that arise during classroom discussions.

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Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Division

Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Division

Looking to build your content knowledge of 4th grade division strategies?
YES…there is a CAP for that!

View the “Train the Trainer” video on “Division Strategies” below to ensure that your instruction has truly met the depth of the 4th grade MAFS standards. Yes, these trainings were written for the benefit of parents, but many of the suggestions will be beneficial when planning to review critical areas at the end of 4th grade to prepare students for 5th.

Follow the steps below to access the 4th grade “Division Strategies CAP (Connecting Academics & Parents)” training materials, including the powerpoint and ancillary resources.

• Step 1: Log into your ideas account.
• Step 2: Go to the Elementary Mathematics Icon.
• Step 3: Click on the “CAP Connecting Academics and Parents” icon.

cap-fractions-1-2

• Step 4: Click on “Grade 4 CAP Math Parent Workshops”.

4th cap ideas 1

• Step 5: Click on 4th CAP “Division Strategies”.

cap div

• Step 6: From there explore the folder to access all the resources you would need to implement the training, including the powerpoint.
div cap
cap div 3

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Nervous about Number Talks? Now is the time to give them a try!

Nervous about Number Talks?  Now is the time to give them a try!

number talks bubble
You most likely have heard the buzz about number talks, but the pressure of state testing may have had you feeling like you didn’t have the time to implement them in your classroom…well no more excuses!

The Mathematics Florida Standards, both the content standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice, require that we as teachers shift our instructional practices to focus on building deep conceptual understanding and sense making in mathematics. In the article “Number Talks Build Numerical Reasoning” from the the October 2011 issue of NCTM’s Teaching Children Mathematics, Sherry Parrish says, “Classroom number talks, five- to fifteen-minute conversations around purposefully crafted computation problems, are a productive tool that can be incorporated into classroom instruction…During number talks, students are asked to communicate their thinking when presenting and justifying solutions to problems they solve mentally. These exchanges lead to the development of more accurate, efficient and flexible strategies.”

number

I think we can all agree that this sounds great, right?! But, how do we get number talks started, and what do they look like in action?

Parrish goes on to describe 5 key components of a classroom number talk:
1) Classroom environment and community. The classroom must be established as a safe, risk-free environment in which all ideas and answers are accepted and valued
2) Classroom discussions. Successful number talks are rooted in communication. When students share and discuss computation strategies, they have the opportunity to clarify their thinking, investigate mathematical relationships, build a toolbox of strategies, evaluate the efficiency of strategies, and consider and test the logic of different strategies.
3) The teacher’s role. The teacher must shift from the “holder of information” to taking on the interconnected roles of facilitator, questioner, listener and learner.
4) Role of mental math. Mental math is a critical component of number talks, because it encourages students to build on number relationships to solve problems, rather than relying on rote procedures. In addition, mental math strengthens students’ understanding of place value.
5) Purposeful computation problems. As part of the teacher’s role as the facilitator of number talks, purposeful problems that will guide students to focus on the desired math relationships must be selected. The goal and purpose of the number talk should determine the numbers and operations of the problem.

Click on the links from insidemathematics.org for an example of a number talk for 2-digit multiplication by 1-digit multiplication:

number-talk-part-1

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number-talk-part-2

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number-talk-part-3

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number-talk-part-4

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post-talk

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Here are additional inside mathematics video clips from a 4th grade number talk, “Can this be true?”, including a pre-and post-talk:

pre-talk

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number-talk

post-talk

For more information on number talks, take our Number Talks training offered by the Hillsborough County Elementary Mathematics Department, read Sherry Parrish’s full article, “Number Talks Build Numerical Reasoning”, or checkout Sherry Parrish’s book Number Talks: Helping Children Build Mental Math and Computation Strategies
Number-Talks

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Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Multi-Digit Multiplication

Connecting Academics and Parents- 4th Grade Multi-Digit Multiplication

Have you checked out the CAP Parent Trainings on the Elementary Mathematics Icon?
Don’t worry….it’s not too late!

While it is true that these trainings were designed with parents in mind, each training also has an accompanying “Train the Trainer” video, that you may find has some valuable instructional tips for you as the teacher. View the video for “Multi-digit Multiplication” below to ensure that your instruction has truly met the depth of the 4th grade MAFS standards. Many of the suggestions may be beneficial when planning for the reviewing of critical areas at the end of 4th grade to prepare students for 5th.

Follow the steps below to access the 4th grade “Strategies for Multi-digit Multiplication CAP (Connecting Academics & Parents)” training materials, including the powerpoint and ancillary resources.

• Step 1: Log into your ideas account.
• Step 2: Go to the Elementary Mathematics Icon.
• Step 3: Click on the “CAP Connecting Academics and Parents” icon.

cap-fractions-1-2

• Step 4: Click on “Grade 4 CAP Math Parent Workshops”.

4th cap ideas 1

• Step 5: Click on 4th CAP “Strategies for Multi-digit Multiplication”.

4th cap ideas 2

• Step 6: From there explore the folder to access all the resources you would need to implement the training, including the powerpoint.
cap 4th mult
cap mul 3

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